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Smokejumpers History
  Aerial Firefighting
 

1965 Redding, California Smoke Jumpers PDF  | Print |  E-mail

 Click the photo for the link to the rest of the photos and information.

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Remembering the Triple Nickles PDF  | Print |  E-mail

First African-American paratroopers also served as smokejumpers

By Paul M. Ross, Jr.

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Above Photo: Early on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, Captain Richard W. Williams and 1st Lt. Clifford Allen, commanding officer and jumpmaster for this “smokejump” mission, peer through the open door of the Troop Carrier Command C-47 at the spot where they will drop 2nd Lt. Harry Sutton and his firefighting team.
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Jumper Recounts Yellowstone Quake Rescue in 1959 PDF  | Print |  E-mail
by Bob Nicol (Missoula ’52) April 2000
Source: The National Smokejumper Association
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The First Jumps PDF  | Print |  E-mail

Source: The National Smokejumper Association

The first actual fire jumps in the history of smokejumping were made by Rufus Robinson and Earl Cooley at Marten Creek in the Nez Perce Forest of Region 1 on July 12, 1940.

The first jumps in Region 6 took place that year on August 10 when Glenn Smith and Francis Lufkin parachuted to a blaze at Bridge Creek in the Chelan Forest of Washington.

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Training PDF  | Print |  E-mail

Source: The National Smokejumper Association

For the new smokejumper programs, beginning operations in 1940, Region 6 was allotted Fiscal Year 1940 funds for the purchase of equipment for both Regions 1 and 6. The purchase of jumping equipment was made by Region 6 from their bid specifications and loft equipment was bought locally by each region. Radios were purchased by Region 6 on bids through the Forest Service Radio Laboratory.

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The Winthrop Experiments PDF  | Print |  E-mail

Source: The National Smokejumper Association

 The Aerial Experimental Project was moved from California to the North Pacific Region (Region 6) area during the summer of 1939. It was at this time that the decision was made to discontinue bombing tests, and at the recommendation of David P. Godwin, Assistant Chief of Fire Control in Washington, D.C., the unexpended balance of experimental funds was authorized for carrying on parachute jumping experiments. The Forest Service prepared a contract, which provided for parachutes, protective clothing, and the services of professional riggers and parachutists. The successful bidder was the Eagle Parachute Company of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

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